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SSCS & tinyML Webinar for Young Excellence - The Intersection of SSCS and AI -- A Tale of Two Journeys - Vivienne Sze & Boris Murmann

Date
2020-05-26
Time
11:00 AM ET
Location
Webinar - Online
Contact
Abira Altvater – abira.altvater@ieee.org
Description

SSCS & tinyML Webinar for Young Excellence - The Intersection of SSCS and AI -- A Tale of Two Journeys - Vivienne Sze & Boris Murmann

This webinar is co-sponsored by SSCS & TinyML.

Register: https://ieee.webex.com/ieee/onstage/g.php?MTID=e9d980b4fa7f10e3f72e98dcdf2ddedc2

ABSTRACT - Today’s technology landscape is dominated by the inescapable excitement of applications and possibilities enabled by artificial intelligence (AI). The timing could not be riper given the availability of big data, sufficient computing capability, and new machine learning techniques. How can aspiring students and professionals both young and seasoned in the field of solid-state circuits get into the action? In this webinar, we will hear two distinguished professors in cutting-edge AI research -- Vivienne Sze of MIT and Boris Murmann of Stanford -- offer their personal stories, insights, and perspectives of how they see circuits applied to the AI realm. They will provide their views of what AI is and isn't, address the types of AI problems they seek to solve and the angle they apply to leverage their established design expertise. Profs. Sze and Murmann will also offer their projections on future research opportunities and advice on how one can prepare to intersect them.

BIOGRAPHY OF SPEAKERS - Vivienne Sze is an associate professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and leads the Research Lab of Electronics’ Energy-Efficient Multimedia Systems research group. Her group works on computing systems that enable energy-efficient machine learning, computer vision, and video compression/processing for a wide range of applications, including autonomous navigation, digital health, and the internet of things. She is widely recognized for her leading work in these areas and has received multiple awards, including the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and DARPA Young Faculty Award, the Edgerton Faculty Award, faculty awards from Google, Facebook, and Qualcomm, the Symposium on VLSI Circuits Best Student Paper Award, the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference Outstanding Invited Paper Award, and the IEEE Micro Top Picks Award. As a member of the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding, she received the Primetime Engineering Emmy Award for the development of the High Efficiency Video Coding video compression standard. Sze earned a BS from the University of Toronto, and an MS and PhD from MIT.

Boris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his PhD degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for embedded machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, an AdCom member and Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford's System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.